Young Drivers Fined £40.7 Million from Motoring Offences Each Year

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Moneyshake can reveal the latest statistics on the UK’s most dangerous young drivers. We submitted a Freedom of Information request to the DVLA (Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency) to uncover the top motoring offences committed by drivers aged 16-25 between 2019 and 2020.

Explore our research below and find out how risky young drivers are on our roads, plus the fines and penalty points they face.

Key findings

  • 81,509 motoring offences were committed by drivers aged 16-25 in the last year
  • Drivers aged 16-25 fined £40.7 million from motoring offences each year
  • 9 young drivers are caught driving illegally every hour in the UK
  • 165 young drivers caught speeding every day, costing £6 million in fines annually

Drivers aged 16-25 fined £40.7 million from motoring offences each year

According to the DVLA, a huge 81,509 motoring offences were committed by drivers aged 16-25 in the last year. This would result in a shocking fine of £40.7 million in total for the young offenders.

A driving conviction is also extremely likely to make your insurance premium go up. So, as well as a fine, 16-25 year olds could see increased insurance prices for the next five years – that’s how long you need to declare a motoring conviction for.

9 young drivers are caught driving illegally every hour in the UK

The huge number of motoring offences recorded mean that nine drivers aged 16-25 are caught driving illegally every hour in the UK. This also works out as 223 young drivers per day, or 1,567 per week.

165 young drivers caught speeding every day, costing £6 million in fines

The DVLA data shows that speeding is the top offence for young drivers, which is no surprise, but the amount that this costs 16-25 year olds is shocking. With 165 drivers aged 16-25 caught speeding every day in the UK and a minimum £100 fine for going over the limit, a massive £6 million in fines is dished out every year.

As well being hit with a speeding fine, young drivers will likely face an insurance spike. A recent study showed that speeding offences could add £70 to your policy price, which is already in the thousands for most young drivers. This means that young offenders will need to fork out a total of £1,106 on average for their car insurance, after being caught speeding.

The top 10 motoring offences by 16-25 year olds

Between 2019 and 2020, young drivers committed a total of 81,509 motoring offences, according to the DVLA. We analysed the data to reveal which is the most common.

Speeding is the most common, accounting for 75% of young driver offences

Speeding is the most popular motoring offence, with 60,432 recorded in total, including speeding on a public road, on the motorway and in a goods vehicle. Young motorists would face up to six points and a maximum £2,500 fine, plus a ban if they’ve passed their test in the last two years.

Driving without insurance is the next most popular offence, with 6,367 young drivers getting caught last year. This risks up to eight points, an unlimited fine and a ban if you’re a new driver.

8 in 10 motoring offences result in a ban for young drivers

Shockingly, eight out of the top 10 motoring offences are serious enough to risk young drivers getting banned, if they’ve just passed their test. The penalty for these offences is up to or more than six points, which would result in your licence being revoked if received within two years of passing.

Statistics from the Department for Transport show that you’re much more likely to pass your test at a young age, which is why 16-25 year olds are at risk of losing their licence altogether by committing these offences.

4,371 drivers aged 16-25 committed multiple motoring offences in the same year

Young motorists haven’t been caught committing just one offence. The DVLA’s data reveals that a huge 4,371 drivers aged 16-25 have committed multiple, separate motoring offences in the same year. Young drivers who are disqualified twice in one year would be banned for at least 12 months.

Surprisingly, we found some drivers who have committed up to five separate motoring crimes! These drivers face a maximum penalty of an incredible 45 points, an unlimited fine, a ban and three years in prison.

Drivers don’t learn from their mistakes – the top 5 repeat offences revealed

It’s clear that many 16-25 year olds don’t learn their lesson as the DVLA’s research uncovers that 1,182 drivers have been caught for the same type of offence in one year. The most common multiple offence is speeding on a public road, with 726 double offences recorded. This would result in a maximum of 12 points, a £2,000 fine and a ban.

We reveal the top five repeat offences below with their max penalty points and fines.

Young drivers caught 4 times in 1 year, risking 8 years in prison

The DVLA’s shocking statistics also show that there are young drivers who commit the same motoring crime up to four times. Our findings show that 16-25 year olds have been caught four times in the same year for:

  • Driving with defective tyres – max 12 points, a ban and a £10,000 fine
  • Drug driving – max 44 points, a ban, unlimited fine and two years in prison
  • Reckless or dangerous driving – max 44 points, a ban, unlimited fine and eight years in prison

Young drivers more likely to commit a motoring crime the closer they get to 25

When comparing the number of offences of age, we found an upward trend, revealing that drivers are more likely to commit a crime as they get older. Surprisingly, 25 year olds committed the highest number of offences, totalling 14,398.

As we requested data on motoring offences obtained in the last year only, this trend isn’t necessarily down to older drivers being on the roads for longer. See the rest of our findings below.

With driving test restrictions lifting, many new young drivers will be getting out on the roads. If you’re about to take your test or have recently passed, read our five top tips to avoid a motoring offence.

For more shocking motoring statistics and news, check out the Moneyshake blog. You’ll find more DVLA data uncovered on learner drivers and the worst place for a parking fine.