Skoda Kodiaq Review

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Skoda Kodiaq

Skoda’s attempt at a seven-seater SUV is one to be marvelled at. Behold, its flagship Kodiaq.

Above just sheer space, the Kodiaq comes with lot of freebies across the range. You’ll want to forget about the rather skimpy entry-level S model, though.

Although the word ‘bulk’ comes to mind, take nothing away from its modern exterior. Despite being a family car, you could quite easily see it blending in within a city environment due to its urban, easy-on-the-eye contemporary look.

“The Skoda Kodiaq has always had an air of solidity and quality about it. Robust build materials work in tandem with assistance systems to make it one of the safest models in its class.”

Cameron Hale, Moneyshake Car Reviewer

Interior

All Skoda Kodiaq models are available in a five-seat or seven-seat option. The extra two seats are at the rear of the car. Granted, these seats aren’t the comfiest for adults because the sloping roofline at the back eats into headspace.

Also, the first set of rear seats are adjustable. So if an adult is sitting in front of you, your knee room is likely to be a bit skinny.

Unless your journey’s short, you’d be best leaving the extra two seats for children or teenagers. Even more so because the handy 12V socket behind them are perfect for letting younger passengers charge their devices.

Not many SUVs can compete with the Kodiaq when it comes to rear passenger space – not even the Peugeot 5008. It has slightly narrower seats compared to the Kodiaq. Seating three adults abreast is easily done, even with a slightly raised middle seat, thanks to big footwells and a marginal hump in the floor.

Passengers in the back can maximise their comfort by manually adjusting their seat to go forwards, backwards and even recline for a kip on them longer motorway journeys.

Up front the Skoda Kodiaq isn’t the most exciting car in terms of interior design and layout. But there’s an inevitable feeling of the car’s good quality build in the cabin areas. Materials are soft and there aren’t many hard plastics about. SE L models also have luxurious alcantara leather seats.

Infotainment and tech

If you aren’t too fussed about a built-in satnav, the next step down is the SE model, which has AppleCarPlay and Android Auto as standard. This way you can link your smartphone to the Kodiaq’s interface and use either Google Maps or Apple Maps. So, in reality, you’re not really missing out.

With Skoda Connect online service you can choose between four different infotainment systems. The entry-level Swing is a 6.5” colour touchscreen with DAB radio, USB connectivity and four speakers. For Bluetooth with voice command controls you’ll want to upgrade to the Bolero system – the next level up. The 8” display is a lot easier on the eye, with a smooth surface that has buttons integrated into it.

The built-in satnav system for the Kodiaq is very good. To get it you’ll need either the Amundsen or range-topping Columbus infotainment system. The step-up is noticeable, though. Google Earth view lets you see a real-life birds-eye view of your journey. Or you can keep the standard 2D view of the road using the standard map setup. The processor for the whole infotainment system aids this, making it a slick and responsive system to use. Not much separates the Amundsen and Columbus, except the DVD drive. But the SD card slot on the Amundsen could be seen as more advanced.

Practicality

Undoubtedly the best part of the Kodiaq is how great it is at making the most of space. And you’ll get this across the board, regardless of what you spend. It’s a true champion in its class as far as practicality is concerned.

Five adults in the car will have plenty of room for comfort on long journeys, and the boot will carry all the luggage brought onboard.

Whether you’re in the front or back, there are great storage options throughout the vehicle. Folder pockets on the front seats big enough for a tablet. Huge door bins on either passenger door. And a centre armrest in the back with three (yes, three!) cupholders on it. Not many people will struggle for cubby space in the Kodiaq.

The boot comes with just as much practicality. 720 litres in the five-seater model is copious – enough room for a family of five’s things. This can be increased to 2,005 litres when you fold the seats in the back.

On the road

So, what’s the Kodiaq like on the road? Well, it’s surprisingly a joyous experience to drive for such a bulky car.

The steering is nice and light, and the suspension is comfy enough until you’re travelling at slow speed. This is when any bumps in the road tend to rattle the cabin. The optional adaptive dampers can come in handy here. Skoda call this Dynamic Chassis Control. It features a comfort mode – but the extra £1,000 to soak up potholes better is quite some spend.

At higher speeds, the Kodiaq’s light steering can seem rather unresponsive. However, on SE L models there’s a sport mode button. When pressed, weight is added to the steering to make the car feel that bit more stable.

Four-wheel drive options are available across the range for better stability, too. But the car isn’t really designed to be off-road.

If you’re in the market for an off-road car, then a Land Rover Discovery is probably a better option for you. Its standard equipment is much better suited for the roughest terrains, such as Hill Descent Control (HDC). This automatically assists the driver with tricky downhill routes by maintaining a constant speed, relative to the gear selected.

There’s a nice selection of engine choices for the Skoda Kodiaq. The best performer is undoubtedly the 2.0 litre diesel, which produces 190bhp. Even with this power, it’s relatively smooth with the automatic transmission. This is the one to go for if you’re travelling a lot of miles. However, if you just want performance without doing a huge number of miles, the 1.4 litre turbo petrol with 150bhp is nippy enough. You’ve then got the best of both worlds.

Still open to suggestions for your next family car? Then check out our reviews for the popular Nissan Qashqai and Kia Sportage.

For the latest car reviews and auto news, check out the Moneyshake blog.